Lambert-St. Louis International Airport is beginning a project to overhaul two major entrances to Terminal 1. Damage from the April 22, 2011 tornado created an opportunity to redesign the terminal’s lower level entrances which will better enhance Lambert’s historic architecture. Lambert is building sleek, all-glass enclosed walkways with generous support from Eastman Chemical Company, as well as insurance proceeds. The glass panels will allow natural lighting to brighten the pathway for the public to and from the lower level Bag Claim. Eastman’s Saflex® and Vanceva® interlayers bring safety, security and UV protection to the laminated glass. LLumar® decorative window films provide a distinct design pattern to the enclosed walkways. The project will be completed in the spring of 2013.  

“When the tornados hit our region last spring, we knew we wanted to bring increased safety to Lambert-St. Louis International Airport,” said Eric Nichols, vice president and general manager of Eastman’s advanced interlayers product lines. “Saflex® PVB interlayers for laminated glass and Eastman’s performance films’ Llumar® post applied decorative window films bring both safety and UV protection to the pedestrian walkway project at the main terminal.  Our products are used in airport applications around the world, and we are happy these products will welcome visitors to the St. Louis region through our “gateway,” Lambert-St. Louis International Airport.”

Eastman’s Saflex® interlayers were also used in the replacement glass for the Terminal 1 vaulted curtain walls on the upper level, which were also heavily damaged during the 2011 tornado.  The Terminal Entrances Project was designed by exp. US Services. C. Rallo Contracting is the prime contractor for the project.  

The Terminal Entrances reconstruction is part of the overall tornado restoration campaign by the Airport totaling approximately $22 million. The Airport is also in the final months of its $70 million Airport Experience Program, which will be the largest interior renovation of Terminal 1 (built1956) and its concourses when it’s completed in 2013. Improvements include renovated restrooms, higher ceilings, new lighting, new interior wall and flooring surfaces, new wayfinding signage and digital directories.