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Lambert’s Terminal Recycling Program Doubles Output in 2013

A comprehensive terminal and concourse recycling program at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport has already seen output double in the first six months since it was implemented earlier this year. Lambert expects to increase output even more with the roll out this week of dozens of combined single-stream recycling and trash containers for all public areas in the terminals, concourses and parking garages. Read the rest of entry »

Historic Aircraft Returns to Lambert with New Digital Exhibit

After a two year hiatus, a historic plane once owned by Charles Lindbergh has returned to Lambert-St. Louis International Airport to hang once again over the C Concourse Checkpoint in Terminal 1. The Missouri History Museum completed a nine-hour installation of the 1934 D-127 Monocoupe aircraft on Sunday, Oct. 20. Wings and other equipment were attached onsite prior to raising the plane into position. The Museum is sharing the experience of the complicated installation through a time lapse video.

The Missouri History Museum has also installed a new interactive history kiosk which is in line-of-sight of the aircraft from the upper level of Terminal 1 overlooking the checkpoint atrium. The kiosk displays the history of Lambert and Charles Lindbergh and also chronicles the efforts by the Museum to save and exhibit this historic aircraft over the years, including its most recent restoration.

The plane was removed in March of 2011 to make way for terminal renovations. During that time, the Missouri history Museum conducted a historic conservation effort of the aircraft, which included preserving the aircraft’s original fabric skin. The Monocoupe was originally installed at Lambert in 1979. The accumulation of dust and other airborne pollutants over 30 years made it necessary for the plane to undergo a complete conservation effort in order to ensure the continued preservation of the aircraft. Stress fractures along several seams in the plane’s fabric covering and the tears caused by general wear required professional attention.

Charles Lindbergh’s Monocoupe plane was built by Lambert Aircraft Corporation in August 1934. It was just one of three planes built completely in St. Louis by the company. He donated it to the Missouri History Museum in 1940.

News Alert: Lambert Photo of the Week

Passengers shop the new CNN Newsstand St. Louis store in Terminal 2.

News Alert. CNN Newsstand is now open in Terminal 2. The bright new shop across from gate E20 features all the latest news, books, magazines and travel necessities with a brand that is trusted globally. The new CNN store opened this week with a few seasonal must haves as well including St. Louis Cardinals hats, shirts, caps and other items--perfect timing for all the fans rooting on the Redbirds through the NLCS. The CNN Newstand is the last new retail store to debut in Terminal 2. The Hudson group has been rolling out new stores and concepts throughout the Airport in 2013.

Missouri History Museum Returning Lindbergh Monocoupe to Lambert Terminal 1

Charles Lindbergh’s plane, which had previously hung in Terminal 1 at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport since 1979 (see left), returns to its place of welcoming passengers to the St. Louis airport. Lindbergh’s 1934 Model D–127 Monocoupe, an iconic symbol to many St. Louis travelers, has been absent for more than two years because of terminal renovations. The plane will be reinstalled late Saturday, October 19. 

Over the course of its more than 30 years hanging in Lambert, the monocoupe was been exposed to dust and other airborne pollutants along with the stress of being suspended from the ceiling. The cumulative effect of these conditions made it necessary for the plane to undergo a complete conservation effort in order to ensure the continued preservation of the aircraft. Stress fractures along several seams in the plane’s fabric covering and the tears caused by general wear required professional attention. When Lambert announced that Terminal 1 would be renovated, the Missouri History Museum worked with Lambert to remove the plane and use the time needed to complete the renovations to conserve the plane.

Charles Lindbergh’s Monocoupe plane was built by Lambert Aircraft Corporation in August 1934 and was one of the first three planes built completely in St. Louis by the company. Lindbergh donated the plane to the Missouri History Museum in 1940.

Before Lindbergh’s plane was placed on display in at Lambert Airport in 1979, Museum staff studied it and found that they had to deal with some issues. They contacted the local Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Chapter 32, and with the help of the McDonnell Douglas Corporation, the plane was prepared for long-term display.

Preserving Lindbergh’s Legacy

Late in March 2011, Museum employees, including Curator Sharon Smith and Conservator Linda Landry, assisted specialty contractors with moving the Monocoupe from Lambert to a storage hangar. Little did they know that a mere two weeks later a tornado would rip through the airport, damaging the very spot where the Monocoupe had hung since 1979.

Conservator Linda Landry managed the conservation effort.  Test results revealed that the fabric of the Lindbergh Monocoupe was the original 1934 aircraft skin. This is exceedingly rare for an aircraft to have maintained its original covering for so long. Once the age of the fabric and covering was established, all effort was made to retain the historic integrity of the plane.

The Monocoupe was constructed using “fabric and dope,” a process still used today. Historic materials and the passage of time create unique challenges for preservation and conservation. In this type of construction, fabric is fitted over the frame and then covered with several layers of airplane dope, a lacquer that is used to protect, waterproof, and make taut the cloth surfaces of airplanes. As the dope dries it shrinks, causing the material to stretch tightly over the frame, creating a smooth surface. Unfortunately, the dope never stops shrinking, so over the years the ever-tightening fabric can put pressure on the framework until the fabric either tears to relieve the stress or weaker parts of the interior structure snap.

Landry and her conservation lab assistant Cailin Carter performed the conservation treatment. The conservation team repaired seams and tears with precision patches and paint compounds. A full inch by inch cleaning of the interior and exterior of the plane was undertaken to remove nearly 34 years of accumulated contaminants.

AOT Fly Girls: Lambert Photo of the Week

Monica McFee and Robin Boyce put their dancing shoes on to an ‘80s jam at the third Annual Art of Travel fundraiser on the B Concourse in T1.

The decade of the ‘80s was alive and well on the B Concourse in Terminal 1 for the Third Annual Art of Travel fundraiser. Attendees of the annual event to raise money for art at Lambert Airport, dressed in colorful ‘80s outfits while enjoying signature food, drinks and music from that decade. For some, the music took over as partygoers hit the dance floor to mirror the fancy moves from Michael Jackson’s classic video, "Thriller." The Art of Travel, ‘80s style theme was supported by Spire, Hudson Group and several other sponsors. A silent auction with artwork from local artists, a photo booth and an ‘80s typewriter tweeting center were among the activities guests enjoyed at the event.

High Glass Exit: Lambert Photo of the Week

Passengers exit the newly remodeled walkway from Terminal 1 to Arrivals Drive this week.

High, bright and now reopen again. Lambert-St. Louis International Airport has completed the majority of construction on the renovation of entry/exit 17, which allows passengers and visitors to walk between the roadway and the baggage claim level of Terminal 1. The walkway is brighter because of the all glass and steel frame design. The lower flat profile of the enclosed walkway is more modern against the backdrop of the domed vaults of Terminal 1. Construction is now beginning on the opposide entry/exit (12) which will feature the same design. That will be completed in the next three to four months.

New T1 Bag Claim Entrance/Exit to Open after Renovation

The makeover of Terminal 1 entrances that connect the Bag Claim level with Arrivals Drive at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport is moving to the second and final phase.

On Tuesday, Oct 1, Lambert will re-open Terminal 1 Entry/Exit 17 which has been renovated with new sleek, all-glass enclosed walkways. Entry/Exit 17 is the main exit for the passenger pick- up zone, car rental shuttles and hotel shuttles.

Also on Tuesday, Lambert will close Terminal 1 Entry/Exit 12 which will also be fully renovated with the same glass and steel architecture over the walkways. The second phase of construction will close one lane of traffic near the work zone.  The loading zone for Super Park shuttles and the Terminal 2 Shuttle, normally located on the curb of the terminal, will be moved to the center island on Arrivals Drive during construction. The project is slated to be completed in three to four months, weather permitting.

The new all-glass enclosed walkways will better enhance Lambert’s historic terminal architecture. The project is being funded with support from the Eastman Chemical Company. The glass panels will allow natural lighting to brighten the pathway for the public to and from the lower level Bag Claim. Eastman’s Saflex® and Vanceva® interlayers bring safety, security and UV protection to the laminated glass. LLumar® decorative window films provide a distinct design pattern to the enclosed walkways.

Horse Play: Lambert Photo of the Week

Two arriving passengers excitedly stop to meet and greet celebrity Anheuser-Busch Clydesdale Levi in Terminal 2.

You could find plenty of horse play from passengers and visitors when Anheuser-Busch Clydesdale Levi appeared in Terminal 2. His visit was in conjuction with the celebration of the opening of EIGHTEEN|76, Tuesday, September 24th. The new restaurant located at Gate E10 attracted alot of attention with its trendy look, premiere beer and tasty food. In honor of the opening, Budweiser Clydesdale Levi was on hand from 1-3pm for passengers and visitors. Levi was a big hit too! Passengers lined up one after the other to take a picture or to pet the celebrity horse. EIGHTEEN|76 pays homage to the founding year of Budweiser. It’s the first airport location with this concept.

Anheuser-Busch Honors Budweiser with New Airport Concept

The iconic history of Budweiser comes alive in St. Louis with the new bar & restaurant concept at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. EIGHTEEN|76, now open in Lambert’s Concourse E in Terminal 2 (Gate E10), pays homage to the founding year of Budweiser, first brewed in the original St. Louis Anheuser-Busch brewery and still brewed there today.

EIGHTEEN|76 is the first airport location for this nostalgic concept which will feature mural accents of Budweiser history with an interior finish that features beechwood, brick and dark metal finishes. A reclaimed aged beech­­wood and stainless steel bar are highlighted with bright re­d seats and accent lighting.

The new concept was developed in partnership with Lambert-St. Louis International Airport and HMSHost, the master food concessionaire at the airport, with valuable input from Anheuser-Busch.

“The city of St. Louis has a great deal of history and HMSHost is proud to help honor this with the opening of EIGHTEEN|76,” said HMSHost Vice President of Business Development Stephen Douglas. “Bringing EIGHTEEN|76 to Terminal 2 provides travelers with an authentic St. Louis experience and a taste of local culture.”  

The bar features nearly a dozen beers in both draft and bottles. EIGHTEEN|76 will also have a top flight wine list. Drinks can be paired with complementary menu items like the roast beef hero sandwich, Gus’ pressed pretzel (with Shock Top Belgian White mustard), farm house cheese plates, steakhouse caprese salad and roasted red pepper hummus with grilled garlic flatbread.   

To celebrate the opening of EIGHTEEN|76 on September 24, Anheuser-Busch gave passengers and airport visitors a unique surprise in Terminal 2. One of the Budweiser Clydesdales made a special appearance inside the ticketing level of Terminal 2 to greet both arriving and departing passengers. 

Fashion Upgrade: Lambert Photo of the Week

Eddie Bauer fashionistas (pictured left to right) Maria Halkia, Marilyn Schmitt, Senaite Mebrahtu and Kidist Eshete have fun stocking and modeling a few of the shop’s trendy garments.

Hudson’s new Eddie Bauer retail store on the C Concourse adds an upgraded flair to shopping at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport for passengers. The store offers a nice mix of clothing for men and women including classic sportswear and business casual. Eddie Bauer also offers passengers the fashionable cardigan on the go and plenty of accessories. Eddie Bauer is part of Lambert Airport’s newest retail concept by the Hudson Group (JG-St. Louis JV) which became the primary news, gifts and specialty concessionaire in February. Eddie Bauer is located adjacent to Gate C6. Lambert's 1,500 square feet Eddie Bauer store is only the second airport location in the country.

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